The year that was: Celebrating 2018 for Women & Leadership Australia and New Zealand.

This year was a really big one for Women & Leadership Australia and New Zealand. We had events in Auckland and Christchurch, and over in Aus we ran the #100daysforchange campaign. It has been a big year for Women & Leadership!

Some of the key takeaways from the latest report on how women interact with the workplace.

A new report by McKinsey & Company and Lean In has uncovered that there has been little improvement for women in the workplace. However, they also make some great recommendations about what workplaces can do to fix the status quo

The Leadership Interviews: Kathryn Crofts, Founding Board Member of Road Sense Australia

We interview Kathryn Crofts, one of our ALP Alumni, about her experiences as a leader, what she learnt and her advice for aspiring leaders.

Can the words caregiver and ambitious be in the same sentence?

Professor Jan Thomas takes a look at how society can move away from tacit assumptions about caring and ambition to champion diversity for all.

Laura Maxwell

Laura Maxwell's career journey​

Laura Maxwell is Chief Commercial Officer at NZME. She has over 20 years of experience in media and is also currently serving as a Chair of the Interactive Advertising Bureau, a Director of the Newspapers Publishers Association and a board member of the Radio Bureau. Laura will be speaking at the upcoming NZME New Zealand Women’s Leadership Symposium so we sat down with her to discuss her career journey.Tell us about your career to date?After completing a BA at Otago University I began a fantastic OE that ended up lasting….much longer than planned! I did get to experience working in a range of industries, improved my skiing and to my father’s relief, started my first ‘real job’ in sales and marketing at the University of Canberra, at 26 years of age. Given the commute was sensational, I also completed a Post-Graduate Diploma in Marketing while I was there.I have worked in small businesses where I have rolled my sleeves up and been involved both along and across the business. This taught me so much and gave me experience in manufacturing, importing, exporting, retailing, packaging, pricing, negotiation, marketing, advertising, sales and finance. Once I joined larger organisations (where your role is more defined), I then had the confidence to challenge and add value to areas ‘outside my remit’. I have been within the media business since 2001 and still love the pace, the brands and how we connect with Kiwis. For me, being in an informal, creative and fast-paced environment suits my ethos of taking the role seriously but having a good time too.What have been some highlights (and low lights!) in your career?Highlights for me have been working with slick, global brands where I got to experience planning, strategy and execution at a level that was simply top notch and at a scale larger than we have in New Zealand. These include working alongside big brands and organisations like Team New Zealand, Louis Vuitton, the America’s Cup, the All Blacks, and the Sydney Organising Committee for the Olympic Games. Working for a business and creating commercial success in a short window, such as for an event, was a steep learning curve for me. For the America’s Cup programme we developed, branded, packaged, retailed, marketed and sold over 90 new products specific to the event with every step of the chain needing approval from the event brand owners. And we hit our targets!  One of the biggest career challenges for me was when I was leading Yahoo!NZ and the Xtra email issue arose. I would not call it a lowlight (although being on conference calls to the States every hour throughout the night seemed like a lowlight at the time!) as it was a great learning experience.  I have used the skills learned during that episode again and again.You are recognised as a leader in your field. What advice would you give other women who aspire to this?Plan where you want to go and create a pathway to get there. Be honest with what your gaps are and improve them. Find businesses where you can make a difference, that excite you and where you ‘fit‘. If you rate a particular leader, then either get a job with them or see if they will mentor you.Choose your battles and understand the impact of your decisions on the business, the brand and other people within the business.Outside your business, give your time to contribute to the betterment of your industry – this will also raise your profile. What groups are there you can join? What initiatives can you develop and lead that will improve the business ecosystem for the industry?What do you think are the most important strengths/skills women need in the workforce now and in the future?The same skills any person needs to be successful. I do not see the key strengths/skills as being different for women. Own your ideas, speak up and add value. However, if you want to position yourself for an executive role, do not volunteer to take notes in meetings or organise the coffee or bring in the baking.When negotiating your remuneration, show how you add value to the business and know what the market rates are for your role. Make sure you have a list of the achievements in the previous year and what your plans are to move the business forward. Take the emotion out of it. The business is not hiring you. They are hiring what you bring to the company.We all know how important networking is. What is your networking strategy?I like talking to interesting people who can see new ways of solving challenges. I seek out people who may have similar challenges to me and share ideas with them. I do not believe it is a numbers game. I would rather have fewer good people that I can call than have the largest list of people.What do you think the biggest challenge facing females in the corporate world, and females in business more generally, at the moment?Confidence. This is the biggest difference I see between men and women in a work environment. I thought it was a Kiwi thing, but I think it is more of women underestimating what they bring to the table. Find the forums to accelerate your worth to the business. If you are delivering value and your employer is not valuing it, then ask for feedback and do not be afraid of what you hear. Then you can decide if there are changes you need to make at work or if the current business is not one that will fulfil your goals and instead find a new one.Would you like to hear Laura Maxwell and other inspirational speakers share their journeys and leadership advice? Join us at the NZME New Zealand Women’s Leadership Symposium from 21-22 June at the Langham Hotel in Auckland. To secure your seat at this phenomenal event, register now.  

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SOME OF THE KEY TAKE HOME MESSAGES FROM THE MCKINSEY & COMPANY AND LEAN IN REPORT INTO WOMEN IN THE WORKPLACE 

five people putting their hands together over a wooden table for teamwork

Last week, McKinsey and Lean In released their annual report into gender equality in the workplace. The report has been going since 2015 and is the largest of its kind in America. This year alone, 279 companies got involved, with their collective amount of employees sitting at around 13 million. On top of that, 64,000 individual employees were surveyed about their experiences in the workplace.

The findings were really interesting- here are some of the key takeaways from the report :

To achieve equality, companies must turn good intentions into concrete action

While the study found that most companies WANT gender equality, and were prepared to advocate for it in their workplace, not many had managed to implement tangible, practical changes in order to advance gender equality for their employees. Things like setting targets and holding their managers and leaders to account were two recommendations for how workplaces could further advance gender equality.

There has been little progress since the study began

Since 2015, when the first study was published, America’s workforce has made barely any progress. Women still remain the most underrepresented group at every level- with women of colour being the smallest minority within that group. Only one in five c-suite leaders is a woman, and only one in 25 is a woman of colour.

Attrition is not the problem

Women and men left their companies for other opportunities at the same rate- 15%. Of those who left, 81% of women and 82% of men indicated that they were leaving to pursue another job.

Women are left behind from the get-go

It is becoming more evident that women are disadvantaged in the workplace from the get-go. The hiring and promotion process is where the biggest opportunity lies for more women to enter, and move up in the workplace, creating a pipeline for more women in the future. However, unconscious biases mean that women find it harder to get into the workforce and once they are there, find it harder to move up. AirBnB worked with Stanford University’s Women’s Leadership Lab to remove bias from their performance evaluation questions and change how they conduct their interviews, and saw a big difference in the talent they were hiring and promoting.

It’s an uneven playing field

The study found that women simply do not have access to an even playing field in the workplace. They have less access to management and senior leaders, are less likely to receive support from their managers and they are more likely to face every day discrimination (although, it should be noted that the men who participated in the survey also reported and gave examples of discrimination in the workplace, so it sounds like everyone needs to be aware of this.)

Women are also more likely to experience sexual harassment in the workplace, and while many of their workplaces have policies saying that the behaviour will not be tolerated, most women believe that they fail to implement the policies effectively.

If you want to read more, the report can be found here.

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